Archive for the ‘Dieting’ Category

How to Get Rid of Belly Fat

Friday, February 25th, 2011
Having belly fats problem? Do you want to get rid of belly fats? Tired from doing everything you can like exercising, decreasing food in take and all those diet regimen? You cannot wear your sexy bikinis or show off your supposed-beach body because of those hideous belly fats. Good though that there are a lot of ways on how to get rid of belly fat. One of the fastest and safest ways is a diet pill that should ensure effectiveness and zero side effects.

Diuretics

Wednesday, October 20th, 2010

Though a lot of people have problems with weight, there are some natural diuretics that help reduce water weight. Food like melon, oat, cabbage and carrot are some which can reduce water retention. Taking them helps in reducing water weight especially if bloated and heavy with water. It’s not really a fix for weight problems but it helps in reducing the extra water in the body. Of course it would still be best to consult with a doctor if taking herbal supplements and diuretics.

Diet Programs

Thursday, July 15th, 2010

Not every diet pill work for everyone and not all diet programs appeal or work for everyone. When regular exercise is not enough for a person, they try different diet programs until they find the diets that work for them. A diet program may require less meat or less food intake while others would give alternative or replacement food to take. Different programs have been developed for different people. For those who like physical activity, there are programs that may work for them.

Brain Health

Friday, January 1st, 2010

Whenever we study and learn, several things happen in our brain: new cells generate, new connections are created between cells, and existing connections between certain cells are strengthened or removed. Studies show that stimulating environment and the presence of beta-endorphin (the good mood hormone) lead to good cell growth in our brains. The Neurological Foundation of New Zealand says these factors affect brain health:

Regular physical exercise. This protects the brain and the way it processes information. Exercise boosts levels of brain-protective chemicals and reduces stress.

Adequate sleep. A good night’s sleep recharges the brain and allows the body to rest and heal. Our brain consolidates memories while we sleep. Inadequate sleep affects the way our brain cells function and can increase the risk of stroke and depression. About seven to nine hours of sleep a night is ideal.

Balanced diet. Your diet should be low in cholesterol and saturated fat. Studies show that foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids (e.g., fish) are good for the brain.

Social connections. Friendships and social networks are important as we age. Good mood hormones help us create new brain cells and keep them healthy.

Mental workout. Use it or lose it! Keeping the brain active and challenged increases its vitality, generates new brain cells, and bolsters connections and reserves.

A Better Alternative

Tuesday, December 29th, 2009

Here are some plant food alternatives to animal protein. You can use them to devise a diet that will help you lose weight without compromising bone health.

Almonds. A cup of dry, roasted, unsalted almonds contains about 30 grams of protein and very low amounts of cholesterol and sodium.
Tofu. Tofu is rich in both protein and calcium. From three ounces of tofu, you get about 20 grams of protein and about 170 milligrams of calcium.

Oatmeal. A cup of oatmeal yields around six grams of protein. Oatmeal is also low in saturated fat and very low in cholesterol and sodium. It is good source of dietary fiber, phosphorus, and selenium, and a very good source of manganese.

Spinach. There may be more to Popeye and spinach than a cartoonist’s tale. A cup of boiled and drained spinach has about five grams of protein. It is low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and a good source dietary and other important minerals and vitamins.

Green peas. A cup of boiled green peas contains about nine grams of protein. Green peas provide a number of essential vitamins, minerals, and dietary fiber, and a very low saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium.

A Different Approach to Getting Fit

Sunday, July 5th, 2009

Many weight-loss programs propose changes in the propositions of the three main food groups–proteins, fats and carbohydrates. How effective are these programs? The Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, placed 811 overweight adults on four different diets over a two-year period. The diets contained varying percentage of fat, protein, and carbohydrate.

After six months, all four diet groups averaged a six-kilogram weight loss, or 7 percent of their original weight, which ever diet they were on. All again began to regain weight after 12 months. After two years, the average weight loss was about four kilograms for all groups. Earlier studies had claimed that higher protein intake reduced appetite and sustained muscle mass better during weight loss. The Harvard researchers’ conclusion: A diet program’s benefits result from the degree to which people stick with them, not from any specified energy reduction formula.